One Day Recruitment Process – what you need to know?


Consider the following scenario: you have recently lost your work (or are likely to lose it), your expenses are piling up, a family member urgently requires medicine or HMO coverage, and money is tight. You read the newspaper, went to an online job site, and discovered a few organizations that advertise the following:

  1. Salary
  2. Sign in Bonus
  3. Weekend Rest Day
  4. Day shift
  5. One Day recruitment Process

It piques your curiosity, so you prepare your résumé and begin planning around what you’ve read, figuring that if it’s a one-day procedure, you’ll be able to obtain a job in a day or two, at worst, a week. So you apply, and as you wait for your interview, the minutes change to hours, and before you know it, your final interview is planned for a week or two later. ‘Whatever happened to the one-day process?’ Diba nakaka-inis?

What exactly is the One-Day Recruitment Process?

There are two things to consider:

  1. It is a time-saving program that helps the recruitment department to handle as many prospects they can, as quickly as possible.
  2. It’s a marketing ploy to attract more applicants who are keen to secure a job as soon as possible.

In terms of the procedure, recruiters must adhere to the recruitment flow, which is as follows:

  1. Screening on paper or online
  1. The first interview (phone or face to face)
  2. Call Simulation and Testing
  3. Job Offer Following the Final Interview

Some businesses set a time limit for each step. A phone or initial face-to-face interview, for example, should not last more than five minutes (some recruiters are so good they already decided to fail or pass you within 30 seconds). The duration of the test should be between 30 and 50 minutes. Finally, the final interview should take no more than 20 to 30 minutes, allowing the organization to adhere to the “one-day processing” policy.

Why does the processing time change?

The recruitment process, while planned, is not a flawless process. It is affected by many factors that can lengthen (or shorten) the processing time. What are some of these elements? The recruitment process, while planned, is not a flawless science. It is affected by many factors that can lengthen (or shorten) the processing time. What are some of these elements?

  • You are blacklisted (shortens the time)
  • One or two recruiters called in sick.
  • There is an overflow of applicants (more than what the recruiters can handle, especially during the peak season – After the release of the 13th-month pay, after graduation, or after the release of a major newspaper ad, during a very popular job fair)
  • The recruiter wanted to fail you during the interview but saw that you are trainable and may endorse you for another interview (so you need to wait again).
  • The recruitment department holds an urgent meeting (this happens a lot).
  • You have an interview schedule. Unfortunately, the interviewer from operations is out of the country/in a meeting/has a death in the family/insert reason here, so you need to be re-scheduled.
  • The account you are being evaluated or applying for has a far-off start date, is not hiring, or is just pooling for candidates.
  • The waiting game is a part of the recruitment process.

As an applicant, there are several things we need to remember:

  1. Do not expect to be processed in one day. Remember, expectation leads to frustration. Frustration shows your impatience. Recruiters see impatience.
  2. Bring food (sandwiches, juice, chips, and gum to freshen your breath). If you need to find a restaurant for a full meal, tell your recruiter. Keep your breaks short during the waiting time – you do want to be there when the recruiter finally calls your name.
  3. Do not plan to visit several companies in one day unless you have a succession of failures (in which case you need to ask yourself why).
  4. Be patient every time, all the time. Remember that you are being watched – by the CCTV, the recruiters, other applicants, and the receptionist (she is a spy, you know).
  5. If (and only if) you pass the initial interview, ask the recruiter what the next steps are and how long each step will be. Also, ask if there is a possibility that you will need to stay beyond 5 PM (this way, you can make plans for food, transportation, etc.)
  6. Spend time chatting with other applicants who’ve already been through the process; this way, you can understand how easy (or hard) the rest of the steps are, and you can mentally and psychologically prepare for them.

It’s true that the line “one-day processing” can often be misleading. However, knowing how the process works and what factors to consider will arm us with more than enough patience as we go through the recruitment process. Finally, I have always believed that we need to keep our expectations in check. My experience has taught me that just because someone is not meeting my expectation doesn’t mean they are doing a poor job.

If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please don’t hesitate to message me.

Se7en

The Low Down on Background Checks


Hi Seven. My best friend told me about your blog and that you answer questions regarding the call center industry and that you’re always online to respond. May question ako: totoo po ba talaga ang background checks? I mean, do companies really spend time, money, and effort just to find out who you are?

TIA for the response.

Lovely

Hello, Lovely. Thank you very much for your email. I hope you don’t mind if I respond here instead. I indeed respond to questions as long as I know the answer (hehe), but it is also false that I am always online; I sleep as well. Haha.

Now, back to your question. Yes, background checks are a requirement not only in the call center industry but also in most businesses in any industry. A background check is a way for the company to ensure that you are who you say you are. Remember that the company will entrust you with their resources, train you, and so on. As a result, the information on your resume must be “true and correct.” It is also a deterrent to criminals and job hoppers.

There are several methods for conducting a background check.

  1. The company contacts the references you provided on your resume over the phone. They may also contact the companies listed to ensure that you worked there.
  2. Home visits are frequently used by multinational corporations, BPOs, and call centers with a financial account. They hire a third-party investigator to confirm your home address. The investigator will also inquire about you among your neighbors (especially about your character).
  3. When they need information about your academic records, they will use registered mail.
  4. “You are what you post,” according to social networking sites. As a result, some companies now include your Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts in their background checks. You’d be surprised at how much your social media accounts reveal about your personality, attitude, and behavior.
  5. Your BIR and SSS company history – This is illegal under the law. The BIR and the SSS are required by law not to disclose your employment history, even to your current employer.

Your character references are significant in your job search. This is why some businesses are particular about the type of reference they require. As an example, consider one colleague, one friend, and one HR representative.

Your character reference must:

  • know you and your work ethic, attitude, and behavior, and give concrete examples of each aspect when needed.
  • Be confident and authoritative.
  • Know they are your character reference.
  • Must expect a call anytime.

Let me know if you need more information.

Thanks.

Se7en

Final Pay Processing (When Can I get My Money?)


Hi Seven. I’m planning to resign from my current CSR post. Being a first timer in the BPO industry, I don’t know how long the processing of the final pay will take and this concerns me because my family and I need the money. I’m hoping you can respond ASAP.

Jeff of Makati

Hello, Jeff. Thank you very much for your email. I hope it’s okay if I post my response. I’m sure there are others out there in the same situation as you. I’ve been in your shoes before. When I left from my recruitment position at a call center in Makati, I didn’t take into account how long it would take me to find another employment, and as a result, I lost a lot of stuff (and people). But I won’t get into the nasty details.

Let’s talk about the process then.

First, make a plan for your resignation. When your manager accepts your resignation, he will notify HR. Assume you’re delivering a 15- or 30-day notice. In that case, you might already expect your income to be withheld (immediate resignation means your salary will be held immediately). Having said that, several employees (including myself) would file for resignation after the distribution of salary, so that the money could be utilised and the worst-case scenario could be avoided. You are aware of your financial circumstances, so consider whether 15 days of income will suffice to tide you over till you start your next employment.

Second, before you resign, make certain that (1) you have already accepted the new position, (2) your job offer has been signed, (3) you are sure of the exact training schedule, and (4) it will not be during the last 15/30 days of your employment with the company (which will force you to go on AWOL, and that is usually bad).

Your salary has been put on hold for the next 30 days. You will be processing your clearance on the last day of your employment with the company. This means that it must be signed by your boss, someone from IT, facilities, finance/accounting, and HR (you also need to return company-owned items like the HMO, your ATM, headset, etc.). It is preferable for you (or anyone) to have your clearance handled on the last day of work; this way, all of the signatories are easier to find (if you’re lucky, they’re all in one spot).

Your final payment will be handled within 60 to 90 days of submitting the clearance to HR. A word of warning here: some organizations cannot meet their promises (which is likely why you are leaving); so, do not plan on how you will spend your final payment until you have received it.

Once you have the check (hurrah!), you need to find out if it is for:

  1. For Deposit Only – You need to deposit the check to your bank account and will have to wait for a few days for the check to clear.
  2. For Encashment – party time! (But you need to go to the bank branch where the check can be drawn. Bummer, right?)

This may sound cliche, but in situations like this, it is true what they say: chance favors the prepared mind; hence, you must plan if you do not want to find yourself in a difficult financial situation just because you did not consider the timetable.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you need more information.

Se7en

When you are offered a job you don’t want…


I’ve received a lot of question related to them being evaluated for a post which is different from what they applied for. Case in point, James applied for a back office account but was evaluated and offered a job for an inbound customer service account. Another candidate, Amiel was applying for the email account but was endorsed to an outbound collections account. Why does this happen? What can you do to avoid it?

1. Remember that a recruiter is a match maker. He/she has several accounts he/she is evaluating you for and his/her priority is to put you in an account which he/she thinks best fits you based on the skills and competencies you have.

2. Remember to read about the company’s accounts/business units. You need to make the recruiter understand that you are applying for a VERY SPECIFIC position and that you should be evaluated for it. Make him/her aware that you know they have other accounts and that you are comfortable with the account/queue you are applying for. You need to say this in a friendly and professional way, that is, if you have the courage. Remember that  YOU ARE BEING EVALUATED, say this only if you are willing to waste time, money, effort, and opportunity and that your need for the job is not paramount. If you are the type who REALLY needs a job, then why be choosy?

3. Learn how to holistically evaluate a job offer. It’s not just about the basic salary, it’s about establishing a career so you can have the money you are aiming for. Keep an open mind when the recruiter tells you that you are qualified for a different queue and will be evaluated for such. When you pass and are being offered a job, take a look at the culture of the company, the opportunities for promotion or side-movement (growth is not just up you know), the job itself, the company mission and vision, the basic pay, the health and welfare package, employee engagement, etc. If you need a day to decide, tell the recruiter. Be professional enough to call the recruiter the following day to advise him/her of your decision.

There are several reasons why you are not being offered the job you are gunning for:

1. You are not qualified for it.

2. You are over-qualified.

3. Your asking is too high.

4. No more vacancy.

5. You are fit for another account.

Only accept a job that you think will be beneficial for you IN THE LONG RUN (not just because you need to get paid ASAP). When you take on a job, you goal is not just to get paid but to develop a career, to look at retirement, and if the job isn’t something you know too well you will not like, there is no point in accepting it. If you decide to accept a job because napipilitan ka at kailangan mo talaga, learn to love that job by removing the mindset that the job is temporary. It’s really all about mindset. It’s also about being able to discipline yourself to be loyal to the company you work for.

 

Hope this helps.

Se7en

How to evaluate a job offer


Seven,

I’m a fresh graduate and a first time applicant in the call center industry and I’m trying to decide between the four job offers given to me. I was not allowed to bring the document home, but I was able to take note of the details. Thing is, I am very confused now. I am unable to decide which offer is best. It would help me a lot if you can give me a personal insight on what to consider when given a job offer. Thanks in advance.

Jason

Dear Jason,

Thank you for sending me an email and for visiting my blog.

I’ll tell you up front that I’m quite meticulous when it comes to deciding whether or not to accept a job offer. I spend a significant amount of time conducting research and comparing the results to a precise set of boundaries and expectations. If the outcome is satisfactory, I will accept the offer.

You are fortunate to have received four separate offers as a beginner; others receive none. When I originally applied to work in the call center industry 15 years ago, I had multiple failed efforts. This encouraged me to continually improve my customer service, language skills, and professional maturity. When the last company I worked for went bankrupt more than a year ago, I embarked on a job-hunting spree. As a result, I was presented with ten different job offers. I was perplexed, too, given how close and juicy the offers were. As a researcher, the desire to make the greatest decision led me to find the Ben Franklin decision-making technique. I strongly advise you to follow the link and read the complete essay.

Now to your question.

I mentioned that when I am given a choice, I set my own limits, which become the basis of my expectations. What are these limits, work-wise:

  • Salary – is it competitive? Is it better than my earlier salary? What about appraisals? When and how often?
  • Health and Welfare– Who is the HMO provider? What is the feedback on this HMO? What is the Maximum Benefit Limit? Pre Existing Condition Limit/coverage? How many dependents are covered? When is it given (Start of employment? Six months later?)
  • Allowances and Night differential– Is the ND competitive?
  • Vacation/Sick/Emergency Leaves available– How many VLs/SLs? When are they available? How are they filed? What is the notice period before claiming a leave? Are there days we are not allowed to file for a VL?
  • Work schedule – What time is the shift? When are the rest days? Is it on the weekend? Is it a split RD?
  • Workload – What type of account? Concerns within the account? Account attrition? Number of calls taken per day? Will there be selling/up-selling? Is it a pioneer account? If not, what batch do I belong to?
  • Training – How long is the training? Schedule? Does it have a certification? What is the pass/fail rate for the certification?
  • Scorecard – What are the KPI’s?
  • Career Development – What kind? How is it implemented? How many have been promoted? To which positions?
  • Management and Leadership – What is the culture and style of the leaders?
  • Tenureship and attrition rate of the account (if info is available) – Will I belong to a new batch/team, or will it be to re-fill the empty posts? (an indication of high attrition?) Why did they resign?
  • Retention program? – is there any? (details are typically withheld by recruiters)
  • The image, stability, and culture of the company– Is it environment friendly? Always business-like? Pro-employee? Pro-management? Is the company viable? Stable? Did it change its name in the past? Declared insolvency? Is it a call center? A BPO? A captive site? A Fortune 500? A nobody?
  • The facilities and amenities – Do they have vending machines? Concessionaire? Smoking area? Gaming and internet kiosks? Sleeping quarters?
  • Security – Is my travel to and from the office safe?
  • Proximity to my residence – Will I be spending more than what I will earn? Is there free and safe parking? Do they provide parking and transit allowance?
  • Friends – Do I have any friends or relatives working there?

It may appear to be a lot, but each of these criteria is equally important because they will make or break my tenure and career advancement in that company. More importantly, I’ve moved on from making my decision solely on the basic salary; after all, there’s more to job than just money. In my experience, I’ve made poor decisions based only on the money offered. I end up resigning because I am unhappy with the work, the company, and so on.

I strongly advise you to look beyond the perks and consider your medium and long-term goals. Consider whether you will be happy in this company if you give it your all. Can you picture yourself rising through the ranks? What are your life’s priorities? Again, using the Ben Franklin decision-making approach, the answers to these questions will help you decide.

I wish you the best of luck in this new chapter of your life; I’m confident you’ll enjoy it. Remember that the decision you make about the job offer is simply the beginning of your journey; what you do with yourself in the meantime will determine your success or failure.

Hope this helps.

Seven