How to evaluate a job offer


Seven,

I’m a fresh graduate and a first time applicant in the call center industry and I’m trying to decide between the four job offers given to me. I was not allowed to bring the document home, but I was able to take note of the details. Thing is, I am very confused now. I am unable to decide which offer is best. It would help me a lot if you can give me a personal insight on what to consider when given a job offer. Thanks in advance.

Jason

Dear Jason,

Thank you for sending me an email and for visiting my blog.

I’ll tell you up front that I’m quite meticulous when it comes to deciding whether or not to accept a job offer. I spend a significant amount of time conducting research and comparing the results to a precise set of boundaries and expectations. If the outcome is satisfactory, I will accept the offer.

You are fortunate to have received four separate offers as a beginner; others receive none. When I originally applied to work in the call center industry 15 years ago, I had multiple failed efforts. This encouraged me to continually improve my customer service, language skills, and professional maturity. When the last company I worked for went bankrupt more than a year ago, I embarked on a job-hunting spree. As a result, I was presented with ten different job offers. I was perplexed, too, given how close and juicy the offers were. As a researcher, the desire to make the greatest decision led me to find the Ben Franklin decision-making technique. I strongly advise you to follow the link and read the complete essay.

Now to your question.

I mentioned that when I am given a choice, I set my own limits, which become the basis of my expectations. What are these limits, work-wise:

  • Salary – is it competitive? Is it better than my earlier salary? What about appraisals? When and how often?
  • Health and Welfare– Who is the HMO provider? What is the feedback on this HMO? What is the Maximum Benefit Limit? Pre Existing Condition Limit/coverage? How many dependents are covered? When is it given (Start of employment? Six months later?)
  • Allowances and Night differential– Is the ND competitive?
  • Vacation/Sick/Emergency Leaves available– How many VLs/SLs? When are they available? How are they filed? What is the notice period before claiming a leave? Are there days we are not allowed to file for a VL?
  • Work schedule – What time is the shift? When are the rest days? Is it on the weekend? Is it a split RD?
  • Workload – What type of account? Concerns within the account? Account attrition? Number of calls taken per day? Will there be selling/up-selling? Is it a pioneer account? If not, what batch do I belong to?
  • Training – How long is the training? Schedule? Does it have a certification? What is the pass/fail rate for the certification?
  • Scorecard – What are the KPI’s?
  • Career Development – What kind? How is it implemented? How many have been promoted? To which positions?
  • Management and Leadership – What is the culture and style of the leaders?
  • Tenureship and attrition rate of the account (if info is available) – Will I belong to a new batch/team, or will it be to re-fill the empty posts? (an indication of high attrition?) Why did they resign?
  • Retention program? – is there any? (details are typically withheld by recruiters)
  • The image, stability, and culture of the company– Is it environment friendly? Always business-like? Pro-employee? Pro-management? Is the company viable? Stable? Did it change its name in the past? Declared insolvency? Is it a call center? A BPO? A captive site? A Fortune 500? A nobody?
  • The facilities and amenities – Do they have vending machines? Concessionaire? Smoking area? Gaming and internet kiosks? Sleeping quarters?
  • Security – Is my travel to and from the office safe?
  • Proximity to my residence – Will I be spending more than what I will earn? Is there free and safe parking? Do they provide parking and transit allowance?
  • Friends – Do I have any friends or relatives working there?

It may appear to be a lot, but each of these criteria is equally important because they will make or break my tenure and career advancement in that company. More importantly, I’ve moved on from making my decision solely on the basic salary; after all, there’s more to job than just money. In my experience, I’ve made poor decisions based only on the money offered. I end up resigning because I am unhappy with the work, the company, and so on.

I strongly advise you to look beyond the perks and consider your medium and long-term goals. Consider whether you will be happy in this company if you give it your all. Can you picture yourself rising through the ranks? What are your life’s priorities? Again, using the Ben Franklin decision-making approach, the answers to these questions will help you decide.

I wish you the best of luck in this new chapter of your life; I’m confident you’ll enjoy it. Remember that the decision you make about the job offer is simply the beginning of your journey; what you do with yourself in the meantime will determine your success or failure.

Hope this helps.

Seven