One Day Recruitment Process – what you need to know?


Think about this scenario: you just lost your job (or is about to), bills are piling up, your family member needs medicine or an HMO coverage ASAP, and money is thin. You scan the newspaper, visited an online job site and found a few companies who dangles the following on their ads:

  1. Salary
  2. Sign in Bonus
  3. Weekend Rest Day
  4. Day shift
  5. One Day recruitment Process

It sparks your interest, you prepare your résumé and start planning around what you read, that if it is a one day process, you’d be able to get a job in a day or two, worst case scenario, a week. So you set out to apply and as your wait for your interview, minutes turn to hours, and the next thing you know, your final interview is scheduled a week or  two later. ‘Anyare sa One Day Process? Nakaka-inis diba?

What is One Day Recruitment Process?

Two things:

  1. It is an efficiency program that allows the recruitment department to process candidates  in the shortest time possible.
  2. It is a marketing maneuver for attracting more applicants who are desperate to get a job ASAP.

As far as process is concerned, recruiters are required to follow the recruitment flow, that is:

  1. Paper or online screening.
  2. Initial interview (phone or face to face)
  3. Testing/Call Simulation
  4. Final Interview
  5. Job Offer

Some companies follow a time limit for each step. For example, a phone or face to face initial interview should not be longer than five minutes (some recruiters are so good they already made the decision to fail or pass you within 30 seconds). Testing should be anywhere between 30 to 50 minutes. Finally, the final interview should be within 20 to 30 minutes. This allows the company to stick to the “one day processing” guideline.

Why does the processing time change?

Although structured, the recruitment process is not a perfect science. It is affected by a lot of factors which could lengthen (or shorten) the processing time. What are some of these factors?

  • You are blacklisted (shortens the time)
  • One or two recruiters called in sick.
  • There is an overflow of applicants (more than what the recruiters can handle, especially during the peak season – After the release of the 13th month pay, after graduation, or after the release of a major newspaper ad, during a very popular job fair)
  • During the interview, the recruiter wanted to fail you but saw that you are trainable and may endorse you for another interview (so you need to wait, again).
  • The recruitment department holds an urgent meeting (this happens a lot).
  • You were scheduled for an interview, unfortunately, the interviewer from operations is out of the country/in a meeting/has a death in the family/insert reason here, so you need to be re-scheduled.
  • The account you are being evaluated or applying for has a far off start date, is not hiring, or is just pooling for candidates.
  • The waiting game is a part of the recruitment process.

As an applicant, there are several things we need to remember:

  1. Do not expect to be processed in one day. Remember, expectation leads to frustration. Frustration shows your impatience. Impatience is seen by recruiters.
  2. Bring food (sandwiches, juice, chips, and gum to freshen your breath). If you need to find a restaurant for a full meal, tell your recruiter. Keep your breaks short during the waiting time – you do want to be there when the recruiter finally calls your name.
  3. Do not plan to visit several companies in one day, unless you have a succession of failures (in which case you need to ask yourself why).
  4. Be patient every time, all the time. Always remember that you are being watched – by the CCTV, the recruiters, other applicants, and the receptionist (she is a spy, you know).
  5. If (and only if) you pass the initial interview, ask the recruiter what the next steps are and how long each step will be. Also, ask if there is a possibility that you will need to stay beyond 5PM (this way you can make plans for food, transportation, etc)
  6. Spend time chatting with other applicants who’ve already been through the process, this way, you can understand how easy (or hard) the rest of the steps are and you can mentally and psychologically prepare for them.

It’s true that the line “one day processing” can often be misleading. However, knowing how the process works and what factors should be considered will arm us with more than enough patience as we go through the recruitment process. Finally, I have always believed that we need to keep our expectations in check. My experience has taught me that just because someone is not meeting my expectation doesn’t mean he or she is doing a poor job.

If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please don’t hesitate to message me.

Se7en

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When you are offered a job you don’t want…


I’ve received a lot of question related to them being evaluated for a post which is different from what they applied for. Case in point, James applied for a back office account but was evaluated and offered a job for an inbound customer service account. Another candidate, Amiel was applying for the email account but was endorsed to an outbound collections account. Why does this happen? What can you do to avoid it?

1. Remember that a recruiter is a match maker. He/she has several accounts he/she is evaluating you for and his/her priority is to put you in an account which he/she thinks best fits you based on the skills and competencies you have.

2. Remember to read about the company’s accounts/business units. You need to make the recruiter understand that you are applying for a VERY SPECIFIC position and that you should be evaluated for it. Make him/her aware that you know they have other accounts and that you are comfortable with the account/queue you are applying for. You need to say this in a friendly and professional way, that is, if you have the courage. Remember that  YOU ARE BEING EVALUATED, say this only if you are willing to waste time, money, effort, and opportunity and that your need for the job is not paramount. If you are the type who REALLY needs a job, then why be choosy?

3. Learn how to holistically evaluate a job offer. It’s not just about the basic salary, it’s about establishing a career so you can have the money you are aiming for. Keep an open mind when the recruiter tells you that you are qualified for a different queue and will be evaluated for such. When you pass and are being offered a job, take a look at the culture of the company, the opportunities for promotion or side-movement (growth is not just up you know), the job itself, the company mission and vision, the basic pay, the health and welfare package, employee engagement, etc. If you need a day to decide, tell the recruiter. Be professional enough to call the recruiter the following day to advise him/her of your decision.

There are several reasons why you are not being offered the job you are gunning for:

1. You are not qualified for it.

2. You are over-qualified.

3. Your asking is too high.

4. No more vacancy.

5. You are fit for another account.

Only accept a job that you think will be beneficial for you IN THE LONG RUN (not just because you need to get paid ASAP). When you take on a job, you goal is not just to get paid but to develop a career, to look at retirement, and if the job isn’t something you know too well you will not like, there is no point in accepting it. If you decide to accept a job because napipilitan ka at kailangan mo talaga, learn to love that job by removing the mindset that the job is temporary. It’s really all about mindset. It’s also about being able to discipline yourself to be loyal to the company you work for.

 

Hope this helps.

Se7en